Greg Abbott’s “Top Priority” Forgotten

As graduation steadily draws nearer, I have reflected on my time in Texas. Not surprisingly, as a student of public policy, this reflection includes the political shenanigans I have been witness to in the last two years. One episode that many seem to have been forgotten is Governor Greg Abbott’s promise to “eliminate rape.”[1] To … Continue reading Greg Abbott’s “Top Priority” Forgotten

The STEM of Stereotypes

Gender stereotypes have often insisted that women don’t belong in STEM fields. Starting in grade school, many girls are told that because of their gender, they lack the natural talent or ability to be successful in such careers. These incorrect assumptions and myriad others undermine the contributions that women have made in the past, and … Continue reading The STEM of Stereotypes

Indigenous Peoples’ Month, 2021: Practicing solidarity for my missing and murdered Indigenous sisters

The Role of Public Service in Protecting Indigenous People November is Indigenous Peoples Heritage Month, and this year (2021), is the first year the celebration comes after President Biden formally recognized Indigenous People’s Day, October 11th, as a federal holiday– an alternative to the controversial Christopher Columbus Day. As I, a student at the Bush … Continue reading Indigenous Peoples’ Month, 2021: Practicing solidarity for my missing and murdered Indigenous sisters

Missing White Woman Syndrome

Gabby Petito. Elizabeth Smart. Amber Hagerman. Diana Quer. Grace Milane. Sarah Everard. Chances are you will recognize one of these names. Lauren Cho. Bibaa Henry and Nicole Smallman. Ashley Loring Heavyrunner. Manuela Chavero. Evelyn Hernandez. Alexis Patterson. Chances are you will not recognize any of these names. Why? There is a phenomenon which occurs in … Continue reading Missing White Woman Syndrome

Seeking Permanent Liberation: The Intergenerational Cycle of Oppression in Maternal Lines

The devastating images conjured after the fall of Kabul resonate in women’s hearts around the globe. Afghani women grew up hearing stories of their grandmothers wearing mini-to-knee-length skirts, pumps, and lipstick, and going to school and work in Kabul in the between the 20s and the 60s.[1] Their mothers donned the burqa in the face … Continue reading Seeking Permanent Liberation: The Intergenerational Cycle of Oppression in Maternal Lines

The Uyghur Genocide: Forced Sterilization to Exterminate the Uyghur People

In the Xinjiang region of China, authorities are sentencing tens of thousands of people to work in “re-education” camps, or labor camps. One of the main reasons cited for their sentence is that they are suspected of terrorist sentiments and extremism. Extremism can be determined by whether they abstain from drinking alcohol or have a … Continue reading The Uyghur Genocide: Forced Sterilization to Exterminate the Uyghur People

“Mansplaining” and Political Voice

Guest author Ben White worked for WomanStats at BYU as an intern in 2016, and graduated in 2018 with a BA in Political Science. Now, as a graduate student at the University of Texas at Austin, his research explores how gender shapes our interactions with American politics. In recent years, "mansplaining", the phenomenon of a … Continue reading “Mansplaining” and Political Voice

Little Old Ladies in Tennis Shoes: My Experiences as a Woman in Local Government

Originally from Chicagoland, guest author Chelsea Bakaitis worked for the WomanStats Project from 2012-2014 while earning a Bachelor of Science in Geography and a minor in Women’s Studies from Brigham Young University. After leaving Utah she made Gainesville, Florida her home along with her husband, dog, two cats, and many house plants. Currently she is … Continue reading Little Old Ladies in Tennis Shoes: My Experiences as a Woman in Local Government